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March 13, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - March 16

Refusing to accept a 9-cent wage increase..Packinghouse workers shut down 140 plants around the country.

March 13, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - March 13

Civil rights activist and suffragist Susan B. Anthony dies at the age of 86. “Join the union, girls, and together say Equal Pay for Equal Work.”

February 28, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 27

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February 21, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 25

February 21, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 24

U.S. Supreme Court upholds Oregon state restrictions on the working hours of women, justified as necessary to protect their health. A laundry owner was fined $10 for making a female employee work more than 10 hours in a single day - 1908

February 21, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 23

W.E.B. DuBois, educator and civil rights activist, born - 1868

February 21, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 22

Representatives of the Knights of Labor and the United Mine Workers meet in St. Louis with 20 other organizations to plan the founding convention of the People’s Party. Objectives: end political corruption, spread the wealth, and combat the oppression of the rights of workers and farmers - 1892
 

February 21, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 21



A state law was enacted in California providing the 8-hour day for most workers, but it was not effectively enforced - 1868
 

February 21, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 20

February 21, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 19

American Federation of Labor issues a charter to its new Railroad Employees Department - 1909

February 13, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 18

One of the first American labor newspapers, The Man, is published in New York City. It cost 1¢ and, according to The History of American Journalism, “died an early death.” Another labor paper, N.Y. Daily Sentinel, had been launched four years earlier - 1834

February 13, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 17

February 13, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 16


Leonora O’Reilly was born in New York. The daughter of Irish immigrants, she began working in a factory at 11, joined the Knights of Labor at 16, and was a volunteer investigator of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire of 1911. She was a founding member of the Women’s Trade Union League - 1870
 

February 13, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 15

Susan B. Anthony, suffragist, abolitionist, labor activist, born in Adams, Mass. "Join the union, girls, and together say: Equal Pay for Equal Work!" - 1820

February 13, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 14

February 13, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 13


(Working Stiffs, Union Maids, Reds, and Riffraff is an encyclopedic guide to 350 labor films from around the world, ranging from those you’ve heard of—Salt of the Earth, The Grapes of Wrath, Roger & Me—to those you’ve never heard of but will fall in love with once you see them. Fiction and nonfiction, the films are about unions, labor history, working-class life, political movements, and the struggle between labor and capital.)

February 13, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 12


  
Abolitionist Frederick Douglass born into slavery near Easton, Md. - 1818
 
John L. Lewis, president of United Mine Workers of America and founding president of the CIO, born near Lucas, Iowa - 1880
 

February 7, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 11

February 7, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 10

Forty workers are killed on Staten Island, N.Y., when a huge storage tank filled with liquefied gas explodes - 1973

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February 7, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 9

 
U.S. Sen. Joseph McCarthy falsely charged that the State Department was riddled with Communists. It seems that just about everyone else the Wisconsin senator didn’t like was a Communist as well, including scores of unionists. This was the beginning of "McCarthyism." He ultimately was officially condemned by the Senate and died of alcoholism - 1950

February 7, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 8

Vigilantes beat IWW organizers for exercising free-speech rights, San Diego - 1912

February 7, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 7


It took 1,231 firefighters 30 hours to put down The Great Baltimore Fire, which started on this day and destroyed 1,500 buildings over an area of some 140 acres - 1904

February 7, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 6

Seattle General Strike begins. The city was run by a General Strike Committee for six days as tens of thousands of union members stopped work in support of 32,000 striking longshoremen - 1919

February 7, 2018 — News

This week in Labor History - February 5

President Bill Clinton signs the Family and Medical Leave Act.  The law requires most employers of 50 or more workers to grant up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave for a family or medical emergency - 1993