News & Events

July 26, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 26

Workers stage a general strike—believed to be the nation’s first—in St. Louis, in support of striking railroad workers. The successful strike was ended when some 3,000 federal troops and 5,000 deputized special police killed at least eighteen people in skirmishes around the city - 1877

July 25, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 25

Workers stage a general strike—believed to be the nation’s first—in St. Louis, in support of striking railroad workers. The successful strike was ended when some 3,000 federal troops and 5,000 deputized special police killed at least eighteen people in skirmishes around the city - 1877

July 22, 2016 — News

CWA District 4 Newsletter #2

We find that newsletters are much more interesting to our membership if they include stories and photos from various Locals. So, please make a point of participating and being included. Summer is upon us and calendars are filling-up with activities. I know Locals are having their membership picnics and gatherings … always a welcomed family activity for our members. Also, a perfect opportunity to take some pictures and get them in for inclusion in our next issue!

July 17, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 17

July 17

July 16, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 16

Ten thousand workers strike Chicago's Int’l Harvester operations - 1919

July 15, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 15

Some 50,000 lumberjacks strike for 8-hour day - 1917

July 14, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 14

The Great Uprising nationwide railway strike begins in Martinsburg, W.Va., after railroad workers are hit with their second pay cut in a year. In the following days, strike riots spread through 17 states. The next week, federal troops were called out to force an end to the strike - 1877

July 13, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 13

Southern Tenant Farmers' Union organized in Tyronza, Ark. - 1934

July 12, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 12

Bisbee, Ariz., deports Wobblies; 1,186 miners sent into desert in manure-laden boxcars. They had been fighting for improved safety and working conditions - 1917

July 11, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 11

Striking coal miners in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, dynamite barracks housing Pinkerton management thugs - 1892

July 10, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 10

Mary McLeod Bethune, educator and civil rights activist, born - 1875

July 9, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 9

The worst rail accident in U.S. history occurs when two trains pulled by 80-ton locomotives collided head-on at Dutchman’s curve in west Nashville, Tenn. 101 people died, another 171 were injured - 1918

July 8, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 8

First anthracite coal strike in U.S. - 1842

July 7, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 7

Striking New York longshoremen meet to discuss ways to keep new immigrants from scabbing. They were successful, at least for a time. On July 14, 500 newly arrived Jews marched straight from their ship to the union hall. On July 15, 250 Italian immigrants 

July 6, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 6

Two strikers and a bystander are killed, 30 seriously wounded by police in Duluth, Minn. The workers, mostly immigrants building the city’s streets and sewers, struck after contractors reneged on a promise to pay $1.75 a day - 1889

July 5, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 5

During a strike against the Pullman Palace Car Company, which had drastically reduced wages, buildings constructed for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago's Jackson Park were set ablaze, reducing seven to ashes - 1894

July 4, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 4

Albert Parsons joins the Knights of Labor. He later became an anarchist and was one of the Haymarket martyrs - 1876

July 3, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 3

Children, employed in the silk mills in Paterson, N.J., go on strike for 11-hour day and 6-day week. A compromise settlement resulted in a 69-hour work week - 1835

July 2, 2016 — News

Today in Labor History - July 2

The first Walmart store opens in Rogers, Ark.  By 2014 the company had 10,000 stores in 27 countries, under 71 different names, employing more than 2 million people. Walmart is known for low wages and extreme anti-unionism - 1962

June 7, 2016 — News

CWA/AT&T Mobility - National Bargained Benefit Bargaining

Final Bargaining Report: we have reached a Tentative Agreement with AT&T Mobility on a four-year National Bargained Benefit Plan.

May 31, 2016 — News

AT&T MOBILITY NBBP BARGAINING #10

Last week the Committee made progress towards a deal that will provide better affordability and more healthcare options for our members at Mobility; including Puerto Rico. 

May 29, 2016 — News

May 29

Animators working for Walt Disney begin what was to become a successful 5-week strike for recognition of their union, the Screen Cartoonists' Guild. The animated feature Dumbo was being created at the time and, according to Wikipedia, a number of strikers are caricatured in the feature as clowns who go to "hit the big boss for a raise" - 1941

May 28, 2016 — News

May 28

The Ladies Shoe Binders Society formed in New York - 1835

May 27, 2016 — News

May 27

The U.S. Supreme Court declares the Depression-era National Industrial Recovery Act to be unconstitutional, about a month before it was set to expire ? 1935